Welcome on GuitarIngenuity.com, one of the leading online guitar websites. The purpose of this site is to provide you with a one-stop-shop experience when it comes to online guitar lessons, free video guitar tutorials, guitar gear and product reviews, news and whatever else you need around your favorite instrument. Allow me to introduce myself and then show you exactly how you can make the most efficient use of GuitarIngenuity.com.

My name is Dieter Ulrich Peise, I am a guitar teacher and founder of this website. I’ve been teaching guitar for over 20 years, with primary focus on guitar beginners. When I started out, the Internet was just slowly gaining more popularity and it didn’t even occur to me that in addition to teaching my students face-to-face lesson, I could also offer an online guitar course for beginners. A lot has changed since, the whole world has gone online, pretty much anything you want is now available somewhere on the Web. The same is true for an abundance of music lessons and ‘learn how to play guitar online’ courses.

About My Course

It used to be a paid-for program priced at $69, but now you can get full life-time access to the entire program for free. In over 25 full lessons (by the way, when I say “lesson”, we are talking about a real lesson, not just a 45-second video!) I will guide you through the process of learning how to play the guitar.

Don’t have a guitar yet? Not sure what accessories to buy? Confused about chords and finger-positions?

No worries, I got you covered. We will talk about these and many other questions in detail!

Here are a few examples of the cool stuff you are about to learn as part of the Beginners Guitar Course:

  • A proper introduction to the guitar
  • All basic and a few slightly advanced guitar chords that will allow you to play thousands of songs
  • Strumming and picking techniques
  • 25 Full Lessons with Worksheets
  • Access to Online Metronome, Tuner, additional tutorials and much more
  • Bonus-Lessons
  • Learn traditional classics such as “Amazing Grace”, rock-out with “Achy Breaky Heart” or play along with Taylor Swift’s “Teardrops on my Guitar.

Are you ready to finally learn how to play the guitar absolutely free of charge?

Latest Guitar News

Wynton Kelly Trio & Wes Montgomery – Smokin’ at the Half Note

In July, 1965, guitarist Wes Montgomery joined the Wynton Kelly Trio as an extra added attraction for the purpose of performing in the top jazz clubs and concert halls throughout the United States. One of their first performances together was at the Newport Jazz Festival where they received a standing ovation.

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Simple Dexterity Finger Stretch Guitar Chord Movement Exercise

I will be putting out a series of short guitar video lessons for slightly advanced players. The first lesson is a simple dexterity finger stretch exercise, using one and the same chord shape, but moving it up and down the fretboard.

The base chord shape here is a simple A5 Power Chord. But we add one more note, the 9th. This adds tension and makes for a dark yet soothing sound. But I guess everybody hears things differently. Anyway, start off with playing the base chord.

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The Joe Pass Trio – Eximious

Eximious, The Joe Pass Trio

Today, I’d like to talk about the next gem in my Joe Pass record collection. We are talking about ‘Eximious’ by The Joe Pass Trio. Well, the latter term can mean a lot of things, but for this specific record,  the three am combo is comprises of Niels-Henning Orstedt Pedersen, Martin Drew and the one and only, Joe Pass.

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Count Basie – Kansas City 6

I was thrilled when this album came in the mail today. “Count Basie – Kansas 6” showcases how well these six outstanding musicians – all renowned capacities in their own right – engage in a breathtaking interplay, or as much more eloquently described in the liner notes below, an ‘amusing exchange’.

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Memorizing Dominant Chords for Beginners

C7 3rd fret guitar chordIf you have listened to any music, you have definitely heard dominant chords played.  They are very common in jazz music and other genres.

A dominant chord contains a number after it, such as “7” (example C7).  Identify the dominant chord by the following:  7, 7th, other numbers such as 9 or 13.  The “dom7” symbol is also used.

In essence it can be remembered as the chord that has just a number after it; no minor or major.  

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