Guitar Questions

A-Major Chord Guitar Finger Problems – Finger Position Alternatives

A-Major Chord

The open A-Major guitar chord is among the first chords you will learn on your instrument. Pretty much all schools of thought, guitar courses and teaching programs feature this particular chord early on in the learning curriculum. I guess it’s save to say that most people find the this chord easy to learn and play – that said, occasionally a student asks me if there are alternative ways to play the open A-Major Chord on guitar, because he/she has issues squeezing three fingers ‘on top of each other’ in the same, namely the 2nd fret.

A-Major Chord Guitar Finger Problems – Finger Position Alternatives was last modified: October 15th, 2016 by Ulrich Peise

Playing An Out-Of-Tune Guitar – Bad Guitar Habits

bad guitar habitsSeriously? Is this even something we need to talk about? It seems pretty clear to me that there really is no situation or set of circumstances where it would be okay to call this not a bad guitar habit. And that very habit does exist, whether you want to believe that or not. I can share plenty of examples with you, but anyway, now that we’re already on the topic, let’s talk about this in a little bit more detail. Because this is more than just a nuisance, willingly and knowingly practicing and playing an out-of-tune guitar will not do you any good, trust me. This goes beyond the ‘bad habit’ thing, it’s just plain silly if you ask me.

Playing An Out-Of-Tune Guitar – Bad Guitar Habits was last modified: July 5th, 2016 by Ulrich Peise

Bad Guitar Habits – Good Guitar Habits – What Are Yours?

Common Guitar HabitsOver the course of learning to play the guitar, many of us develop certain habits. Some of which can be counterproductive or don’t really help your progress at all. Other guitar habits can be very beneficial to your learning experience and some are somewhere in between, I guess. Also, before we get into a more detail, we need to acknowledge that while there are definitely some guitar habits where we can be safely and universally agree upon are bad, and the there are others which are good. Lastly, there are some things that I would view as situational – these are habits or behaviors that may work well for one person, but are rather detrimental to another. It then ultimately comes down to your personal preference and learning style.

Bad Guitar Habits – Good Guitar Habits – What Are Yours? was last modified: August 10th, 2016 by Ulrich Peise

Maple vs Rosewood Fingerboards – Is There A Difference?

Maple vs Rosewood guitar neck differenceOh-oh, that’s one of those dreaded guitar questions, isn’t it? Maple vs. Rosewood Fingerboards! Some people are convinced that there is not even a noticeable, but actually rather significant difference in tone and not just the way they feel. Personally, I have my doubts that there actually is that much of a gap, as a matter of fact, I would go as far as saying that if there is in fact a difference, it’s marginal at best. And as such, to me, irrelevant when it comes to the sound and tone question with regard to Rosewood vs. Maplewood neck.

Maple vs Rosewood Fingerboards – Is There A Difference? was last modified: June 11th, 2016 by Ulrich Peise

Does It Make Sense To Take The ‘Learn Guitar In 21 Days Challenge’?

How To Learn Guitar In 21 DaysWell, it I guess it depends whom you ask. Before I share with you what I think of this whole ‘Learn Guitar In 21 Days Challenge”, let’s first discuss what you actually want. I need to better understand from you why you feel you need to learn guitar in only 21 days. Do you really only have three weeks of time? Because if you do, in all honesty, I would actually discourage you from even thinking about this project any more.

Here is why: let’s say you want to learn a new language, which is actually very comparable to learning guitar in a way. So, what do you think you can reasonably expect after less than a month of studying a foreign language? Not all that much, right? Otherwise all of us would be fluent in a bunch of languages, if it was that easy.
The fact is, it’s not that easy. It’s as simple as that. However, you didn’t come here to have me telling you what can and can’t be done. So, if you are really dead-set on getting this 21 days guitar challenge going, then let’s see how you can go about it.

Does It Make Sense To Take The ‘Learn Guitar In 21 Days Challenge’? was last modified: June 10th, 2016 by Ulrich Peise

Learn To Play Guitar In 21 Days – Free Download Of Jamplay Coupons

learn guitar in 21 days challengeIf you want to learn to play guitar in 21 days, I’d definitely recommend that you download my exclusive coupon codes which will save you anywhere between 10% and 25%, depending on what you sign-up for.

Now, I gather you are here because you already made the decision that you want to learn guitar in just three weeks. I don’t mean to discourage you or belabor this point – but just be clear on your expectations. After only three weeks of playing, assuming you are a beginner, there is no point in keeping your hopes up high. To learn guitar in 21 days is just not possible, I don’t care what others say.

Learn To Play Guitar In 21 Days – Free Download Of Jamplay Coupons was last modified: June 10th, 2016 by Ulrich Peise

Learn To Play Guitar In 21 Days And Save Money

Learn Guitar In 21 DaysSo, we discussed this a couple of times before. Personally, I don’t see the point in making a plan to learn to play guitar in 21 days, because I feel that you might be setting yourself up for failure. That said, I do acknowledge that it will all come down to your interpretation of what your understanding is regarding “Learning Guitar”. It can mean anything from strumming a couple of chords to becoming Dream Theater’s lead guitarist if Petrucci ever decides to quit his job.

Now before we talk about this in more detail, allow me to at least make one quick point before we cover specifically my proposal on how I would go about if I had to learn guitar in just 21 days.

Learn To Play Guitar In 21 Days And Save Money was last modified: June 10th, 2016 by Ulrich Peise